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How to develop and grade an exam for 20,000 students (or maybe just 200 or 20)

Publication ,  Journal Article
Hunt, F; Kmoch, J; Nevison, C; Rodger, S; Zelenski, J
Published in: SIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education)
January 1, 2002

Although our students may spend only a class period working one of our exams, as instructors, we invest many more hours crafting the questions and grading their responses. How do we ensure our time is well-spent? What qualities contribute to an effective exam? How can we guarantee a fair evaluation of student performance? With an 18-year track record delivering a nationwide exam, the Advanced Placement Computer Science (AP CS) program has a wealth of experience in the area of exam development and administration. This special session will bring together members of the AP CS Development Committee and the Educational Testing Service to share some of their insights into how the experts do it. AP teachers will learn more about the exam for which they are preparing their students. College faculty will gain a better understanding of the metrics provided by the AP exam. All instructors will come away with practical and transferable ideas for successful exam tactics.

Duke Scholars

Published In

SIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education)

DOI

ISSN

0097-8418

Publication Date

January 1, 2002

Start / End Page

285 / 286

Related Subject Headings

  • Education
 

Citation

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Hunt, F., Kmoch, J., Nevison, C., Rodger, S., & Zelenski, J. (2002). How to develop and grade an exam for 20,000 students (or maybe just 200 or 20). SIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education), 285–286. https://doi.org/10.1145/563517.563453
Hunt, F., J. Kmoch, C. Nevison, S. Rodger, and J. Zelenski. “How to develop and grade an exam for 20,000 students (or maybe just 200 or 20).” SIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education), January 1, 2002, 285–86. https://doi.org/10.1145/563517.563453.
Hunt F, Kmoch J, Nevison C, Rodger S, Zelenski J. How to develop and grade an exam for 20,000 students (or maybe just 200 or 20). SIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education). 2002 Jan 1;285–6.
Hunt, F., et al. “How to develop and grade an exam for 20,000 students (or maybe just 200 or 20).” SIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education), Jan. 2002, pp. 285–86. Scopus, doi:10.1145/563517.563453.
Hunt F, Kmoch J, Nevison C, Rodger S, Zelenski J. How to develop and grade an exam for 20,000 students (or maybe just 200 or 20). SIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education). 2002 Jan 1;285–286.

Published In

SIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education)

DOI

ISSN

0097-8418

Publication Date

January 1, 2002

Start / End Page

285 / 286

Related Subject Headings

  • Education