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The jaw adductors of strepsirrhines in relation to body size, diet, and ingested food size.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Perry, JMG; Hartstone-Rose, A; Wall, CE
Published in: Anatomical record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007)
April 2011

Body size and food properties account for much of the variation in the hard tissue morphology of the masticatory system whereas their influence on the soft tissue anatomy remains relatively understudied. Data on jaw adductor fiber architecture and experimentally determined ingested food size in a broad sample of 24 species of extant strepsirrhines allows us to evaluate several hypotheses about the influence of body size and diet on the masticatory muscles. Jaw adductor mass scales isometrically with body mass (β = 0.99, r = 0.95), skull size (β = 1.04, r = 0.97), and jaw length cubed (β = 1.02, r = 0.95). Fiber length also scales isometrically with body mass (β = 0.28, r = 0.85), skull size (β = 0.33, r = 0.84), and jaw length cubed (β = 0.29, r = 0.88). Physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) scales with isometry or slight positive allometry with body mass (β = 0.76, r = 0.92), skull size (β = 0.78, r = 0.94), and jaw length cubed (β = 0.78, r = 0.91). Whereas PCSA is isometric to body size estimates in frugivores, it is positively allometric in folivores. Independent of body size, fiber length is correlated with maximum ingested food size, suggesting that ingestive gape is related to fiber excursion. Comparisons of temporalis, masseter, and medial pterygoid PCSA in strepsirrhines of different diets suggest that there may be functional partitioning between these muscle groups.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Anatomical record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007)

DOI

EISSN

1932-8494

ISSN

1932-8486

Publication Date

April 2011

Volume

294

Issue

4

Start / End Page

712 / 728

Related Subject Headings

  • Temporal Muscle
  • Strepsirhini
  • Species Specificity
  • Skull
  • Regression Analysis
  • Pterygoid Muscles
  • Organ Size
  • Masticatory Muscles
  • Mastication
  • Masseter Muscle
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Perry, J. M. G., Hartstone-Rose, A., & Wall, C. E. (2011). The jaw adductors of strepsirrhines in relation to body size, diet, and ingested food size. Anatomical Record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007), 294(4), 712–728. https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.21354
Perry, Jonathan M. G., Adam Hartstone-Rose, and Christine E. Wall. “The jaw adductors of strepsirrhines in relation to body size, diet, and ingested food size.Anatomical Record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007) 294, no. 4 (April 2011): 712–28. https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.21354.
Perry JMG, Hartstone-Rose A, Wall CE. The jaw adductors of strepsirrhines in relation to body size, diet, and ingested food size. Anatomical record (Hoboken, NJ : 2007). 2011 Apr;294(4):712–28.
Perry, Jonathan M. G., et al. “The jaw adductors of strepsirrhines in relation to body size, diet, and ingested food size.Anatomical Record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007), vol. 294, no. 4, Apr. 2011, pp. 712–28. Epmc, doi:10.1002/ar.21354.
Perry JMG, Hartstone-Rose A, Wall CE. The jaw adductors of strepsirrhines in relation to body size, diet, and ingested food size. Anatomical record (Hoboken, NJ : 2007). 2011 Apr;294(4):712–728.
Journal cover image

Published In

Anatomical record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007)

DOI

EISSN

1932-8494

ISSN

1932-8486

Publication Date

April 2011

Volume

294

Issue

4

Start / End Page

712 / 728

Related Subject Headings

  • Temporal Muscle
  • Strepsirhini
  • Species Specificity
  • Skull
  • Regression Analysis
  • Pterygoid Muscles
  • Organ Size
  • Masticatory Muscles
  • Mastication
  • Masseter Muscle