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Perioperative hypothermia (33 degrees C) does not increase the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm surgery: findings from the Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Nguyen, HP; Zaroff, JG; Bayman, EO; Gelb, AW; Todd, MM; Hindman, BJ; IHAST-MIDS and IHAST Investigators,
Published in: Anesthesiology
August 2010

Perioperative hypothermia has been reported to increase the occurrence of cardiovascular complications. By increasing the activity of sympathetic nervous system, perioperative hypothermia also has the potential to increase cardiac injury and dysfunction associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage.The Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial randomized patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm surgery to intraoperative hypothermia (n = 499, 33.3 degrees +/- 0.8 degrees C) or normothermia (n = 501, 36.7 degrees +/- 0.5 degrees C). Cardiovascular events (hypotension, arrhythmias, vasopressor use, myocardial infarction, and others) were prospectively followed until 3-month follow-up and were compared in hypothermic and normothermic patients. A subset of 62 patients (hypothermia, n = 33; normothermia, n = 29) also had preoperative and postoperative (within 24 h) measurement of cardiac troponin-I and echocardiography to explore the association between perioperative hypothermia and subarachnoid hemorrhage-associated myocardial injury and left ventricular function.There was no difference between hypothermic and normothermic patients in the occurrence of any single cardiovascular event or in composite cardiovascular events. There was no difference in mortality (6%) between groups, and there was only a single primary cardiovascular death (normothermia). There was no difference between hypothermic and normothermic patients in postoperative versus preoperative left ventricular regional wall motion or ejection fraction. Compared with preoperative values, hypothermic patients had no postoperative increase in cardiac troponin-I (median change 0.00 microg/l), whereas normothermic patients had a small postoperative increase (median change + 0.01 microg/l, P = 0.038).In patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm surgery, perioperative hypothermia was not associated with an increased occurrence of cardiovascular events.

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Published In

Anesthesiology

DOI

EISSN

1528-1175

ISSN

0003-3022

Publication Date

August 2010

Volume

113

Issue

2

Start / End Page

327 / 342

Related Subject Headings

  • Treatment Outcome
  • Prospective Studies
  • Perioperative Care
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Intraoperative Care
  • Intracranial Aneurysm
  • Hypothermia, Induced
  • Humans
  • Follow-Up Studies
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Nguyen, H. P., Zaroff, J. G., Bayman, E. O., Gelb, A. W., Todd, M. M., Hindman, B. J., & IHAST-MIDS and IHAST Investigators, . (2010). Perioperative hypothermia (33 degrees C) does not increase the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm surgery: findings from the Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial. Anesthesiology, 113(2), 327–342. https://doi.org/10.1097/aln.0b013e3181dfd4f7
Nguyen, Hoang P., Jonathan G. Zaroff, Emine O. Bayman, Adrian W. Gelb, Michael M. Todd, Bradley J. Hindman, and Bradley J. IHAST-MIDS and IHAST Investigators. “Perioperative hypothermia (33 degrees C) does not increase the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm surgery: findings from the Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial.Anesthesiology 113, no. 2 (August 2010): 327–42. https://doi.org/10.1097/aln.0b013e3181dfd4f7.

Published In

Anesthesiology

DOI

EISSN

1528-1175

ISSN

0003-3022

Publication Date

August 2010

Volume

113

Issue

2

Start / End Page

327 / 342

Related Subject Headings

  • Treatment Outcome
  • Prospective Studies
  • Perioperative Care
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Intraoperative Care
  • Intracranial Aneurysm
  • Hypothermia, Induced
  • Humans
  • Follow-Up Studies