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Eva Aimable Naumann

Assistant Professor of Neurobiology
Neurobiology
311 Research Dr, Box 3209, Durham, NC 27710
311 Research Dr, Bryan Research Bldg 327F, Durham, NC 27710

Selected Publications


Imaging across multiple spatial scales with the multi-camera array microscope

Journal Article Optica · April 1, 2023 This paper experimentally examines different configurations of a multi-camera array microscope (MCAM) imaging technology. The MCAM is based upon a densely packed array of “micro-cameras” to jointly image across a large field-of-view (FOV) at high resolutio ... Full text Cite

Gigapixel imaging with a novel multi-camera array microscope.

Journal Article Elife · December 14, 2022 The dynamics of living organisms are organized across many spatial scales. However, current cost-effective imaging systems can measure only a subset of these scales at once. We have created a scalable multi-camera array microscope (MCAM) that enables compr ... Full text Link to item Cite

Data from: Gigapixel behavioral and neural activity imaging with a novel multi-camera array microscope

Dataset · February 10, 2022 The dynamics of living organisms are organized across many spatial scales, yet existing, cost-effective imaging systems can measure only a subset of these scales at once. Here, we have created a scalable multi-camera array microscope (MCAM) that enables co ... Full text Cite

Whole-brain interactions underlying zebrafish behavior.

Journal Article Curr Opin Neurobiol · December 2020 Detailed quantification of neural dynamics across the entire brain will be the key to genuinely understanding perception and behavior. With the recent developments in microscopy and biosensor engineering, the zebrafish has made a grand entrance in neurosci ... Full text Link to item Cite

Imaging the behavior and neural activity of freely moving organisms with a gigapixel microscope

Conference Optics InfoBase Conference Papers · January 1, 2019 We present a micro-camera array microscope that images at cellular-level detail across hundreds of square centimeters. We demonstrate how this microscope can image the behavior and fluorescent neural activity of freely swimming zebrafish ... Full text Cite

From Whole-Brain Data to Functional Circuit Models: The Zebrafish Optomotor Response.

Journal Article Cell · November 3, 2016 Detailed descriptions of brain-scale sensorimotor circuits underlying vertebrate behavior remain elusive. Recent advances in zebrafish neuroscience offer new opportunities to dissect such circuits via whole-brain imaging, behavioral analysis, functional pe ... Full text Link to item Cite

Brain-wide mapping of neural activity controlling zebrafish exploratory locomotion.

Journal Article Elife · March 22, 2016 In the absence of salient sensory cues to guide behavior, animals must still execute sequences of motor actions in order to forage and explore. How such successive motor actions are coordinated to form global locomotion trajectories is unknown. We mapped t ... Full text Open Access Link to item Cite

Neural Circuits Underlying Visually Evoked Escapes in Larval Zebrafish.

Journal Article Neuron · February 3, 2016 Escape behaviors deliver organisms away from imminent catastrophe. Here, we characterize behavioral responses of freely swimming larval zebrafish to looming visual stimuli simulating predators. We report that the visual system alone can recruit lateralized ... Full text Link to item Cite

Whole-brain activity mapping onto a zebrafish brain atlas.

Journal Article Nat Methods · November 2015 In order to localize the neural circuits involved in generating behaviors, it is necessary to assign activity onto anatomical maps of the nervous system. Using brain registration across hundreds of larval zebrafish, we have built an expandable open-source ... Full text Link to item Cite

Monitoring neural activity with bioluminescence during natural behavior.

Journal Article Nat Neurosci · April 2010 Existing techniques for monitoring neural activity in awake, freely behaving vertebrates are invasive and difficult to target to genetically identified neurons. We used bioluminescence to non-invasively monitor the activity of genetically specified neurons ... Full text Link to item Cite