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Physiological Fitness and the Pathophysiology of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL).

Publication ,  Journal Article
Sitlinger, A; Deal, MA; Garcia, E; Thompson, DK; Stewart, T; MacDonald, GA; Devos, N; Corcoran, D; Staats, JS; Enzor, J; Weinhold, KJ ...
Published in: Cells
May 2021

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is associated with physical dysfunction and low overall fitness that predicts poor survival following the commencement of treatment. However, it remains unknown whether higher fitness provides antioncogenic effects. We identified ten fit (CLL-FIT) and ten less fit (CLL-UNFIT) treatment-naïve CLL patients from 144 patients who completed a set of physical fitness and performance tests. Patient plasma was used to determine its effects on an in vitro 5-day growth/viability of three B-cell cell lines (OSU-CLL, Daudi, and Farage). Plasma exosomal miRNA profiles, circulating lipids, lipoproteins, inflammation levels, and immune cell phenotypes were also assessed. CLL-FIT was associated with fewer viable OSU-CLL cells at Day 1 (p = 0.003), Day 4 (p = 0.001), and Day 5 (p = 0.009). No differences between the groups were observed for Daudi and Farage cells. Of 455 distinct exosomal miRNAs identified, 32 miRNAs were significantly different between the groups. Of these, 14 miRNAs had ≤-1 or ≥1 log2 fold differences. CLL-FIT patients had five exosomal miRNAs with lower expression and nine miRNAs with higher expression. CLL-FIT patients had higher HDL cholesterol, lower inflammation, and lower levels of triglyceride components (all p < 0.05). CLL-FIT patients had lower frequencies of low-differentiated NKG2+/CD158a/bneg (p = 0.015 and p = 0.014) and higher frequencies of NKG2Aneg/CD158b+ mature NK cells (p = 0.047). The absolute number of lymphocytes, including CD19+/CD5+ CLL-cells, was similar between the groups (p = 0.359). Higher physical fitness in CLL patients is associated with altered CLL-like cell line growth in vitro and with altered circulating and cellular factors indicative of better immune functions and tumor control.

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Published In

Cells

DOI

EISSN

2073-4409

ISSN

2073-4409

Publication Date

May 2021

Volume

10

Issue

5

Start / End Page

1165

Related Subject Headings

  • Phenotype
  • Middle Aged
  • MicroRNAs
  • Male
  • Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
  • Lipoproteins
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell
  • Killer Cells, Natural
  • Inflammation
  • Humans
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Sitlinger, A., Deal, M. A., Garcia, E., Thompson, D. K., Stewart, T., MacDonald, G. A., … Bartlett, D. B. (2021). Physiological Fitness and the Pathophysiology of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL). Cells, 10(5), 1165. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10051165
Sitlinger, Andrea, Michael A. Deal, Erwin Garcia, Dana K. Thompson, Tiffany Stewart, Grace A. MacDonald, Nicolas Devos, et al. “Physiological Fitness and the Pathophysiology of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL).Cells 10, no. 5 (May 2021): 1165. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10051165.
Sitlinger A, Deal MA, Garcia E, Thompson DK, Stewart T, MacDonald GA, et al. Physiological Fitness and the Pathophysiology of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL). Cells. 2021 May;10(5):1165.
Sitlinger, Andrea, et al. “Physiological Fitness and the Pathophysiology of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL).Cells, vol. 10, no. 5, May 2021, p. 1165. Epmc, doi:10.3390/cells10051165.
Sitlinger A, Deal MA, Garcia E, Thompson DK, Stewart T, MacDonald GA, Devos N, Corcoran D, Staats JS, Enzor J, Weinhold KJ, Brander DM, Weinberg JB, Bartlett DB. Physiological Fitness and the Pathophysiology of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL). Cells. 2021 May;10(5):1165.

Published In

Cells

DOI

EISSN

2073-4409

ISSN

2073-4409

Publication Date

May 2021

Volume

10

Issue

5

Start / End Page

1165

Related Subject Headings

  • Phenotype
  • Middle Aged
  • MicroRNAs
  • Male
  • Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
  • Lipoproteins
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell
  • Killer Cells, Natural
  • Inflammation
  • Humans