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Biological age is increased by stress and restored upon recovery.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Poganik, JR; Zhang, B; Baht, GS; Tyshkovskiy, A; Deik, A; Kerepesi, C; Yim, SH; Lu, AT; Haghani, A; Gong, T; Hedman, AM; Andolf, E; Clish, CB ...
Published in: Cell Metab
May 2, 2023

Aging is classically conceptualized as an ever-increasing trajectory of damage accumulation and loss of function, leading to increases in morbidity and mortality. However, recent in vitro studies have raised the possibility of age reversal. Here, we report that biological age is fluid and exhibits rapid changes in both directions. At epigenetic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic levels, we find that the biological age of young mice is increased by heterochronic parabiosis and restored following surgical detachment. We also identify transient changes in biological age during major surgery, pregnancy, and severe COVID-19 in humans and/or mice. Together, these data show that biological age undergoes a rapid increase in response to diverse forms of stress, which is reversed following recovery from stress. Our study uncovers a new layer of aging dynamics that should be considered in future studies. The elevation of biological age by stress may be a quantifiable and actionable target for future interventions.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Cell Metab

DOI

EISSN

1932-7420

Publication Date

May 2, 2023

Volume

35

Issue

5

Start / End Page

807 / 820.e5

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Parabiosis
  • Mice
  • Humans
  • Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • COVID-19
  • Animals
  • Aging
  • 1101 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics
  • 0601 Biochemistry and Cell Biology
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Poganik, J. R., Zhang, B., Baht, G. S., Tyshkovskiy, A., Deik, A., Kerepesi, C., … Gladyshev, V. N. (2023). Biological age is increased by stress and restored upon recovery. Cell Metab, 35(5), 807-820.e5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2023.03.015
Poganik, Jesse R., Bohan Zhang, Gurpreet S. Baht, Alexander Tyshkovskiy, Amy Deik, Csaba Kerepesi, Sun Hee Yim, et al. “Biological age is increased by stress and restored upon recovery.Cell Metab 35, no. 5 (May 2, 2023): 807-820.e5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2023.03.015.
Poganik JR, Zhang B, Baht GS, Tyshkovskiy A, Deik A, Kerepesi C, et al. Biological age is increased by stress and restored upon recovery. Cell Metab. 2023 May 2;35(5):807-820.e5.
Poganik, Jesse R., et al. “Biological age is increased by stress and restored upon recovery.Cell Metab, vol. 35, no. 5, May 2023, pp. 807-820.e5. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2023.03.015.
Poganik JR, Zhang B, Baht GS, Tyshkovskiy A, Deik A, Kerepesi C, Yim SH, Lu AT, Haghani A, Gong T, Hedman AM, Andolf E, Pershagen G, Almqvist C, Clish CB, Horvath S, White JP, Gladyshev VN. Biological age is increased by stress and restored upon recovery. Cell Metab. 2023 May 2;35(5):807-820.e5.
Journal cover image

Published In

Cell Metab

DOI

EISSN

1932-7420

Publication Date

May 2, 2023

Volume

35

Issue

5

Start / End Page

807 / 820.e5

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Parabiosis
  • Mice
  • Humans
  • Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • COVID-19
  • Animals
  • Aging
  • 1101 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics
  • 0601 Biochemistry and Cell Biology