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Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychotherapy research: a brief introduction to concepts, methods, and task selection.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Carrig, MM; Kolden, GG; Strauman, TJ
Published in: Psychotherapy research : journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research
July 2009

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become an increasingly important methodology in the study of psychotherapy outcome and process. In this article, the authors offer a brief introduction to the use of fMRI in psychotherapy research aimed primarily at the informed clinician or investigator and with the goal of facilitating an understanding of study design and interpretation of research findings. After introducing the method and offering a rationale for its use in the study of psychotherapy, the authors outline major issues in fMRI data collection and analysis and emphasize the central role of the tasks used during the imaging session as critical to the interpretation of findings. They discuss how task selection influences the conclusions that can be drawn from fMRI studies of psychotherapeutic intervention and close with recommendations and caveats for the consumer of fMRI/psychotherapy research.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Psychotherapy research : journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research

DOI

EISSN

1468-4381

ISSN

1050-3307

Publication Date

July 2009

Volume

19

Issue

4-5

Start / End Page

409 / 417

Related Subject Headings

  • Psychotherapy
  • Psychometrics
  • Psychology
  • Oxygen
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Humans
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Brain
  • 5203 Clinical and health psychology
  • 5201 Applied and developmental psychology
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Carrig, M. M., Kolden, G. G., & Strauman, T. J. (2009). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychotherapy research: a brief introduction to concepts, methods, and task selection. Psychotherapy Research : Journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research, 19(4–5), 409–417. https://doi.org/10.1080/10503300902735864
Carrig, Madeline M., Gregory G. Kolden, and Timothy J. Strauman. “Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychotherapy research: a brief introduction to concepts, methods, and task selection.Psychotherapy Research : Journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research 19, no. 4–5 (July 2009): 409–17. https://doi.org/10.1080/10503300902735864.
Carrig MM, Kolden GG, Strauman TJ. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychotherapy research: a brief introduction to concepts, methods, and task selection. Psychotherapy research : journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research. 2009 Jul;19(4–5):409–17.
Carrig, Madeline M., et al. “Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychotherapy research: a brief introduction to concepts, methods, and task selection.Psychotherapy Research : Journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research, vol. 19, no. 4–5, July 2009, pp. 409–17. Epmc, doi:10.1080/10503300902735864.
Carrig MM, Kolden GG, Strauman TJ. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychotherapy research: a brief introduction to concepts, methods, and task selection. Psychotherapy research : journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research. 2009 Jul;19(4–5):409–417.

Published In

Psychotherapy research : journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research

DOI

EISSN

1468-4381

ISSN

1050-3307

Publication Date

July 2009

Volume

19

Issue

4-5

Start / End Page

409 / 417

Related Subject Headings

  • Psychotherapy
  • Psychometrics
  • Psychology
  • Oxygen
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Humans
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Brain
  • 5203 Clinical and health psychology
  • 5201 Applied and developmental psychology