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Mechanistic basis for the failure of cone transducin to translocate: why cones are never blinded by light.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Lobanova, ES; Herrmann, R; Finkelstein, S; Reidel, B; Skiba, NP; Deng, W-T; Jo, R; Weiss, ER; Hauswirth, WW; Arshavsky, VY
Published in: J Neurosci
May 19, 2010

The remarkable ability of our vision to function under ever-changing conditions of ambient illumination is mediated by multiple molecular mechanisms regulating the light sensitivity of rods and cones. One such mechanism involves massive translocation of signaling proteins, including the G-protein transducin, into and out of the light-sensitive photoreceptor outer segment compartment. Transducin translocation extends the operating range of rods, but in cones transducin never translocates, which is puzzling because cones typically function in much brighter light than rods. Using genetically manipulated mice in which the rates of transducin activation and inactivation were altered, we demonstrate that, like in rods, transducin translocation in cones can be triggered when transducin activation exceeds a critical level, essentially saturating the photoresponse. However, this level is never achieved in wild-type cones: their superior ability to tightly control the rates of transducin activation and inactivation, responsible for avoiding saturation by light, also accounts for the prevention of transducin translocation at any light intensity.

Duke Scholars

Published In

J Neurosci

DOI

EISSN

1529-2401

Publication Date

May 19, 2010

Volume

30

Issue

20

Start / End Page

6815 / 6824

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Transducin
  • Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells
  • Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells
  • RGS Proteins
  • Protein Transport
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery
  • Models, Biological
  • Mice, Knockout
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Mice
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Lobanova, E. S., Herrmann, R., Finkelstein, S., Reidel, B., Skiba, N. P., Deng, W.-T., … Arshavsky, V. Y. (2010). Mechanistic basis for the failure of cone transducin to translocate: why cones are never blinded by light. J Neurosci, 30(20), 6815–6824. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0613-10.2010
Lobanova, Ekaterina S., Rolf Herrmann, Stella Finkelstein, Boris Reidel, Nikolai P. Skiba, Wen-Tao Deng, Rebecca Jo, Ellen R. Weiss, William W. Hauswirth, and Vadim Y. Arshavsky. “Mechanistic basis for the failure of cone transducin to translocate: why cones are never blinded by light.J Neurosci 30, no. 20 (May 19, 2010): 6815–24. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0613-10.2010.
Lobanova ES, Herrmann R, Finkelstein S, Reidel B, Skiba NP, Deng W-T, et al. Mechanistic basis for the failure of cone transducin to translocate: why cones are never blinded by light. J Neurosci. 2010 May 19;30(20):6815–24.
Lobanova, Ekaterina S., et al. “Mechanistic basis for the failure of cone transducin to translocate: why cones are never blinded by light.J Neurosci, vol. 30, no. 20, May 2010, pp. 6815–24. Pubmed, doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0613-10.2010.
Lobanova ES, Herrmann R, Finkelstein S, Reidel B, Skiba NP, Deng W-T, Jo R, Weiss ER, Hauswirth WW, Arshavsky VY. Mechanistic basis for the failure of cone transducin to translocate: why cones are never blinded by light. J Neurosci. 2010 May 19;30(20):6815–6824.

Published In

J Neurosci

DOI

EISSN

1529-2401

Publication Date

May 19, 2010

Volume

30

Issue

20

Start / End Page

6815 / 6824

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Transducin
  • Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells
  • Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells
  • RGS Proteins
  • Protein Transport
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery
  • Models, Biological
  • Mice, Knockout
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Mice