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Rapid taste responses in the gustatory cortex during licking.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Stapleton, JR; Lavine, ML; Wolpert, RL; Nicolelis, MAL; Simon, SA
Published in: J Neurosci
April 12, 2006

Rapid tastant detection is necessary to prevent the ingestion of potentially poisonous compounds. Behavioral studies have shown that rats can identify tastants in approximately 200 ms, although the electrophysiological correlates for fast tastant detection have not been identified. For this reason, we investigated whether neurons in the primary gustatory cortex (GC), a cortical area necessary for tastant identification and discrimination, contain sufficient information in a single lick cycle, or approximately 150 ms, to distinguish between tastants at different concentrations. This was achieved by recording neural activity in GC while rats licked four times without a liquid reward, and then, on the fifth lick, received a tastant (FR5 schedule). We found that 34% (61 of 178) of GC units were chemosensitive. The remaining neurons were activated during some phase of the licking cycle, discriminated between reinforced and unreinforced licks, or processed task-related information. Chemosensory neurons exhibited a latency of 70-120 ms depending on concentration, and a temporally precise phasic response that returned to baseline in tens of milliseconds. Tastant-responsive neurons were broadly tuned and responded to increasing tastant concentrations by either increasing or decreasing their firing rates. In addition, some responses were only evoked at intermediate tastant concentrations. In summary, these results suggest that the gustatory cortex is capable of processing multimodal information on a rapid timescale and provide the physiological basis by which animals may discriminate between tastants during a single lick cycle.

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Published In

J Neurosci

DOI

EISSN

1529-2401

Publication Date

April 12, 2006

Volume

26

Issue

15

Start / End Page

4126 / 4138

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Water Deprivation
  • Taste
  • Reaction Time
  • Rats, Long-Evans
  • Rats
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery
  • Male
  • Electrophysiology
  • Drinking Behavior
  • Cerebral Cortex
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
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Stapleton, J. R., Lavine, M. L., Wolpert, R. L., Nicolelis, M. A. L., & Simon, S. A. (2006). Rapid taste responses in the gustatory cortex during licking. J Neurosci, 26(15), 4126–4138. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0092-06.2006
Stapleton, Jennifer R., Michael L. Lavine, Robert L. Wolpert, Miguel A. L. Nicolelis, and Sidney A. Simon. “Rapid taste responses in the gustatory cortex during licking.J Neurosci 26, no. 15 (April 12, 2006): 4126–38. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0092-06.2006.
Stapleton JR, Lavine ML, Wolpert RL, Nicolelis MAL, Simon SA. Rapid taste responses in the gustatory cortex during licking. J Neurosci. 2006 Apr 12;26(15):4126–38.
Stapleton, Jennifer R., et al. “Rapid taste responses in the gustatory cortex during licking.J Neurosci, vol. 26, no. 15, Apr. 2006, pp. 4126–38. Pubmed, doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0092-06.2006.
Stapleton JR, Lavine ML, Wolpert RL, Nicolelis MAL, Simon SA. Rapid taste responses in the gustatory cortex during licking. J Neurosci. 2006 Apr 12;26(15):4126–4138.

Published In

J Neurosci

DOI

EISSN

1529-2401

Publication Date

April 12, 2006

Volume

26

Issue

15

Start / End Page

4126 / 4138

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Water Deprivation
  • Taste
  • Reaction Time
  • Rats, Long-Evans
  • Rats
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery
  • Male
  • Electrophysiology
  • Drinking Behavior
  • Cerebral Cortex