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Inkjet-printed point-of-care immunoassay on a nanoscale polymer brush enables subpicomolar detection of analytes in blood.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Joh, DY; Hucknall, AM; Wei, Q; Mason, KA; Lund, ML; Fontes, CM; Hill, RT; Blair, R; Zimmers, Z; Achar, RK; Tseng, D; Gordan, R; Freemark, M ...
Published in: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
August 22, 2017

The ELISA is the mainstay for sensitive and quantitative detection of protein analytes. Despite its utility, ELISA is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and infrastructure-dependent, limiting its availability in resource-limited regions. Here, we describe a self-contained immunoassay platform (the "D4 assay") that converts the sandwich immunoassay into a point-of-care test (POCT). The D4 assay is fabricated by inkjet printing assay reagents as microarrays on nanoscale polymer brushes on glass chips, so that all reagents are "on-chip," and these chips show durable storage stability without cold storage. The D4 assay can interrogate multiple analytes from a drop of blood, is compatible with a smartphone detector, and displays analytical figures of merit that are comparable to standard laboratory-based ELISA in whole blood. These attributes of the D4 POCT have the potential to democratize access to high-performance immunoassays in resource-limited settings without sacrificing their performance.

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Published In

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A

DOI

EISSN

1091-6490

Publication Date

August 22, 2017

Volume

114

Issue

34

Start / End Page

E7054 / E7062

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Printing
  • Polymers
  • Point-of-Care Systems
  • Leptin
  • Immunoglobulin M
  • Immunoglobulin G
  • Immunoassay
  • Humans
  • Equipment Design
  • Blood Chemical Analysis
 

Citation

APA
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Joh, D. Y., Hucknall, A. M., Wei, Q., Mason, K. A., Lund, M. L., Fontes, C. M., … Chilkoti, A. (2017). Inkjet-printed point-of-care immunoassay on a nanoscale polymer brush enables subpicomolar detection of analytes in blood. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 114(34), E7054–E7062. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1703200114
Joh, Daniel Y., Angus M. Hucknall, Qingshan Wei, Kelly A. Mason, Margaret L. Lund, Cassio M. Fontes, Ryan T. Hill, et al. “Inkjet-printed point-of-care immunoassay on a nanoscale polymer brush enables subpicomolar detection of analytes in blood.Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 114, no. 34 (August 22, 2017): E7054–62. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1703200114.
Joh DY, Hucknall AM, Wei Q, Mason KA, Lund ML, Fontes CM, et al. Inkjet-printed point-of-care immunoassay on a nanoscale polymer brush enables subpicomolar detection of analytes in blood. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Aug 22;114(34):E7054–62.
Joh, Daniel Y., et al. “Inkjet-printed point-of-care immunoassay on a nanoscale polymer brush enables subpicomolar detection of analytes in blood.Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, vol. 114, no. 34, Aug. 2017, pp. E7054–62. Pubmed, doi:10.1073/pnas.1703200114.
Joh DY, Hucknall AM, Wei Q, Mason KA, Lund ML, Fontes CM, Hill RT, Blair R, Zimmers Z, Achar RK, Tseng D, Gordan R, Freemark M, Ozcan A, Chilkoti A. Inkjet-printed point-of-care immunoassay on a nanoscale polymer brush enables subpicomolar detection of analytes in blood. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Aug 22;114(34):E7054–E7062.
Journal cover image

Published In

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A

DOI

EISSN

1091-6490

Publication Date

August 22, 2017

Volume

114

Issue

34

Start / End Page

E7054 / E7062

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Printing
  • Polymers
  • Point-of-Care Systems
  • Leptin
  • Immunoglobulin M
  • Immunoglobulin G
  • Immunoassay
  • Humans
  • Equipment Design
  • Blood Chemical Analysis