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Barriers to implementing antimicrobial stewardship programs in three low- and middle-income country tertiary care settings: findings from a multi-site qualitative study.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Rolfe, R; Kwobah, C; Muro, F; Ruwanpathirana, A; Lyamuya, F; Bodinayake, C; Nagahawatte, A; Piyasiri, B; Sheng, T; Bollinger, J; Zhang, C ...
Published in: Antimicrob Resist Infect Control
March 25, 2021

BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance has been named as one of the top ten threats to public health in the world. Hospital-based antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) can help reduce antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine perceived barriers to the development and implementation of ASPs in tertiary care centers in three low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 45 physicians at tertiary care hospitals in Sri Lanka (n = 22), Kenya (12), and Tanzania (11). Interviews assessed knowledge of antimicrobial resistance and ASPs, current antimicrobial prescribing practices, access to diagnostics that inform antimicrobial use, receptiveness to ASPs, and perceived barriers to implementing ASPs. Two independent reviewers coded the interviews using principles of applied thematic analysis, and comparisons of themes were made across the three sites. RESULTS: Barriers to improving antimicrobial prescribing included prohibitively expensive antimicrobials, limited antimicrobial availability, resistance to changing current practices regarding antimicrobial prescribing, and limited diagnostic capabilities. The most frequent of these barriers in all three locations was limited drug availability. Many physicians in all three sites had not heard of ASPs before the interviews. Improved education was a suggested component of ASPs at all three sites. The creation of guidelines was also recommended, without prompting, by interviewees at all three sites. Although most participants felt microbiological results were helpful in tailoring antibiotic courses, some expressed distrust of laboratory culture results. Biomarkers like erythrocyte sedimentation rate and c-reactive protein were not felt to be specific enough to guide antimicrobial therapy. Despite limited or no prior knowledge of ASPs, most interviewees were receptive to implementing protocols that would include documentation and consultation with ASPs regarding antimicrobial prescribing. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlighted several important barriers to implementing ASPs that were shared between three tertiary care centers in LMICs. Improving drug availability, enhancing availability of and trust in microbiologic data, creating local guidelines, and providing education to physicians regarding antimicrobial prescribing are important steps that could be taken by ASPs in these facilities.

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Published In

Antimicrob Resist Infect Control

DOI

EISSN

2047-2994

Publication Date

March 25, 2021

Volume

10

Issue

1

Start / End Page

60

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Tertiary Care Centers
  • Tanzania
  • Sri Lanka
  • Qualitative Research
  • Physicians
  • Kenya
  • Humans
  • Health Plan Implementation
  • Drug Resistance, Bacterial
  • Developing Countries
 

Citation

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Rolfe, R., Kwobah, C., Muro, F., Ruwanpathirana, A., Lyamuya, F., Bodinayake, C., … Tillekeratne, L. G. (2021). Barriers to implementing antimicrobial stewardship programs in three low- and middle-income country tertiary care settings: findings from a multi-site qualitative study. Antimicrob Resist Infect Control, 10(1), 60. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13756-021-00929-4
Rolfe, Robert, Charles Kwobah, Florida Muro, Anushka Ruwanpathirana, Furaha Lyamuya, Champica Bodinayake, Ajith Nagahawatte, et al. “Barriers to implementing antimicrobial stewardship programs in three low- and middle-income country tertiary care settings: findings from a multi-site qualitative study.Antimicrob Resist Infect Control 10, no. 1 (March 25, 2021): 60. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13756-021-00929-4.
Rolfe R, Kwobah C, Muro F, Ruwanpathirana A, Lyamuya F, Bodinayake C, et al. Barriers to implementing antimicrobial stewardship programs in three low- and middle-income country tertiary care settings: findings from a multi-site qualitative study. Antimicrob Resist Infect Control. 2021 Mar 25;10(1):60.
Rolfe, Robert, et al. “Barriers to implementing antimicrobial stewardship programs in three low- and middle-income country tertiary care settings: findings from a multi-site qualitative study.Antimicrob Resist Infect Control, vol. 10, no. 1, Mar. 2021, p. 60. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/s13756-021-00929-4.
Rolfe R, Kwobah C, Muro F, Ruwanpathirana A, Lyamuya F, Bodinayake C, Nagahawatte A, Piyasiri B, Sheng T, Bollinger J, Zhang C, Ostbye T, Ali S, Drew R, Kussin P, Anderson DJ, Woods CW, Watt MH, Mmbaga BT, Tillekeratne LG. Barriers to implementing antimicrobial stewardship programs in three low- and middle-income country tertiary care settings: findings from a multi-site qualitative study. Antimicrob Resist Infect Control. 2021 Mar 25;10(1):60.
Journal cover image

Published In

Antimicrob Resist Infect Control

DOI

EISSN

2047-2994

Publication Date

March 25, 2021

Volume

10

Issue

1

Start / End Page

60

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Tertiary Care Centers
  • Tanzania
  • Sri Lanka
  • Qualitative Research
  • Physicians
  • Kenya
  • Humans
  • Health Plan Implementation
  • Drug Resistance, Bacterial
  • Developing Countries